Quantum entanglement aboard orbiting CubeSat

Researchers developed a miniaturized source of quantum entanglement that measures only 20 by 10 centimeters. Credit: Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore

Researchers have generated and detected quantum entanglement onboard a CubeSat nanosatellite weighing less than 2.6 kilograms and orbiting the Earth. The CubeSat was deployed into orbit from the International Space Station on 17 June 2019.

The team, led by University of Singapore, demonstrated that their miniaturized source of quantum entanglement can operate successfully in space aboard a low-resource, cost-effective CubeSat that is smaller than a shoebox. CubeSats are a standard type of nanosatellite made of multiples of 10 cm × 10 cm × 10 cm cubic units.

As a first step, the researchers needed to demonstrate that a miniaturized photon source for quantum entanglement could stay intact through the stresses of launch and operate successfully in the harsh environment of space within a satellite that can provide minimal energy. To accomplish this, they exhaustively examined every component of the photon-pair source used to generate quantum entanglement to see if it could be made smaller or more rugged.

The new miniaturized photon-pair source consists of a blue laser diode that shines on nonlinear crystals to create pairs of photons. Achieving high-quality entanglement required a complete redesign of the mounts that align the nonlinear crystals with high precision and stability.

The researchers qualified their new instrument for space by testing its ability to withstand the vibration and thermal changes experienced during a rocket launch and in-space operation. The photon-pair source maintained very high-quality entanglement throughout the testing, and crystal alignment was preserved even after repeated temperature cycling from -10°C to 40°C.

The goal of their system is to be future part of a global quantum network transmitting quantum signals to receivers on Earth or on other spacecraft. (Phys.org)

The paper has been published in Optica.

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